Format: Webinar, original date November 18, 2020
Hosted by: Infopeople
Length: 1 hour

While physical branches may have closed their doors at the onset of COVID-19 pandemic, most libraries continued to offer a wealth of digital content, as well as transition some of their in-person programming to an online format. But, how do we take accommodations from our physical library space to an online space?

In this webinar you will learn about web accessibility fundamentals for ADA compliance from a working specialist in the field. You will discover how to tie digital accessibility and ADA compliance in with other principles of design (UDL) to create the best and most seamless programming experience possible. Making your documents, presentations, and PDFs accessible online will set you up for further success, and it’s easier than you think.

Presented by: Elle Noe

Format: Webinar, original date December 3, 2014
Hosted by: NCompass Live, Nebraska Library Commission
Length: 1 hour

Northlake (IL) Public Library District has seen a dramatic demographic shift over the last twenty years. More than half of the service community speaks Spanish at home and as many as one third are foreign born. To address the changing needs of their community, Northlake Public Library District has hired bilingual staff and added many bilingual programs. One pressing issue that directly affects this community is the U.S. immigration policy and getting accurate information on these policies. This session will focus on how Northlake Public Library District has incorporated legal information on temporary driver's licenses, Deferred Action, and citizenship into its library programming.

Presented by: Kathy Ladell

Format: Webinar, original date February 6, 2019
Hosted by: Infopeople
Length: 1 hour

With numerous budget cuts to social services programs, public libraries are encountering more individuals experiencing homelessness, and poverty. For many, a library may be the only place of refuge from the weather, or noise from a downtown cityscape. The increasing volume of need arising in many communities may leave library workers feeling ill-equipped or overwhelmed.

Because of this, libraries are asking the questions: Why are there so many people experiencing homelessness in our libraries? How do we better serve our vulnerable customers? How do we educate and support our library staff? During this webinar social worker Elissa Hardy will address these questions and explore some solutions.

Presented by: Elissa Hardy

Format: Webinar, original date May 11, 2017
Hosted by: WebJunction and Library Journal
Length: 1 hour

There is much more to supporting immigrants and refugees than hanging out a "welcome" sign at your library. Successful programs and services are specifically tailored to meet the needs of the range of populations who may come through your doors. Hear from Movers & Shakers who work with communities to empower vulnerable and often underserved populations with a sense of belonging and self-reliance. Learn innovative approaches to identifying and celebrating immigrant leaders; how to foster networking between native-born and newcomer populations and between immigrant groups of varying national origins; how to highlight immigrant-positive narratives; and more. You'll be sure to find practical ideas among the multi-pronged strategies that these librarians have used to ensure that new immigrants really do feel welcomed by the library and the community.

Presented by: Will Chan, Jamie Torres and Sophie Maier

Format: Webinar, original date May 22, 2024
Hosted by: WebJunction
Length: 1 hour

In 2023, Brooklyn Public Library launched a research project to collect and study cardholder signup policies from public libraries across the nation. The project aims to identify the range of policies and procedures which govern cardholder access as well as the rationale used for establishing these policies. Research findings have been summarized in a report made available to the library field beginning spring 2024. Join us for a discussion about the inspiration for this study, how the research was conducted, and key findings and takeaways using data from more than 1,800 public libraries across the United States.  

Presented by: Amy Mikel and Emily Thomas

Format: Webinar, original date May 7, 2019

Hosted by: Infopeople
Length: 1 hour

Demographic projections suggest that the U.S. is headed toward a minority-majority population. Around the country, libraries are adapting their approaches and services in order to create more welcoming environments for immigrant and refugee communities. The upcoming Decennial Census in 2020 will offer insight into current demographic realities in the U.S., and public libraries around the country are at the forefront of the demographic shift.

In this webinar, Jessica Moore, Immigrant Program Specialist with The Indianapolis Public Library, will discuss strategies for creating a more welcoming, inclusive library. We’ll look at the challenges that libraries face connecting with this shifting population. We’ll also look at how strategic partnerships can help libraries overcome challenges in order to fulfill their role as public service institutions.

Presented by: Jessica Moore

Format: Webinar, original date January 28, 2016
Hosted by: WebJunction
Length: 1.5 hours

In this interactive session, we will explore what it means to provide inclusive outreach to and engagement with members of your local community. How do you identify the needs of the diverse communities your library is serving? What are effective approaches for community engagement, and how do you apply what you learn along the way to improve your practice? Come prepared with a challenge or opportunity from your own community that you would like to workshop with your peers during the webinar. You will also leave with a framework and action plan for cultivating partnerships for successful community engagement.

Presented by: CiKeithia Pugh, Hayden Bass, and Rekha Kuver

Format: Webinar, original date March 22, 2023
Hosted by: WebJunction
Length: 1 hour

Broadly defined, restorative justice is an approach to repairing and addressing harm done within a community. Related to this approach, restorative practices provide proactive ways to build the relationships that can help to address and repair some of that harm done. Oak Park Public Library is using restorative practices to better serve both community and staff. In this session, you’ll learn about restorative justice and restorative practices, and how these practices can guide a powerful shift in communities and within an organizational culture. The webinar will have actionable strategies you can start practicing immediately, as well as methods for you to build buy-in from your organization as you get started on this impactful work.

Presented by: Stephen Jackson and Tatiana Swancy

Format: Webinar, original date December 5, 2019
Hosted by: WebJunction and Library Journal
Length: Length: 1 hour

How does a library respond to a community in deep crisis around race and social justice? That’s the question that Richland Library in Columbia, S.C., grappled with in 2017. Recognizing that there was no single answer, they launched initiatives on multiple internal and external fronts. Starting with a Social Awareness Taskforce, geared toward community engagement and courageous conversations, they explored topics surrounding social and criminal justice, women’s rights and race. By using innovative approaches like Circles of Dialogue and mobile empathy labs, nearly 1,500 people have participated in the library’s race, equity and inclusion programming. To further their efforts, they have also focused internally, empowering staff to lead the charge to understand their biases, macroaggressions, and cultural competence through Let’s Talk gatherings, Check Your Bubble worksheets, and other effective tools. Hearing how Richland Library moved the needle on honest dialogue, empathy, and equity with their staff and community, you will be inspired to dig in and do the work at your own library.

Presented by: Tamara King, Ci Ci Holloway and Dee Robinson

Format: Webinar, original date August 28, 2019

Hosted by: NCompass Live, Nebraska Library Commission
Length: 1 hour

Libraries have traditionally charged overdue fines for 3 reasons: to generate revenue, get materials back on time (and at all), and teach responsibility. But what if all of these assumptions are wrong? It turns out they are! In this webinar, learn why these reasons are old fashioned—and just plain incorrect—notions that create a real barrier to using the library for many people, and how ditching fines leads to an increase in library use and circulation, with no negative effects. It’s a win-win for your library and community!

In this session, Beth and Meg review the research and results from the growing number of libraries across the country that have ditched late fines and coaxed new and former users to their doors. They share talking points, tips, and an advocacy tool you can use to build a case to eliminate fines in your library. At the end of the session, you will feel inspired and well-equipped to gather your library's data and patron stories and advocate for ditching late fines at your library in order to provide more equitable service.

Presenters: Beth Crist and Meg DePriest

Format: Webinar, original date July 7, 2022
Hosted by: WebJunction
Length: 1 hour

In the U.S., there are 43 million adults–nearly one in five–who read below a third-grade level, and over half of all adults read below a sixth-grade level (National Action Plan for Adult Literacy, 2021). Low levels in literacy can impact many aspects of daily life including the ability to find and maintain employment, navigate health care needs, and complete government forms. This webinar will explore the characteristics of adults with low literacy levels and how they differ from those of adults with learning disabilities, including how and why each of these groups approaches reading. Learn about the importance and value of developing literacy skills, as well as strategies for library staff on how to identify when someone may need literacy support, how to broach the subject with a patron, and ways to suggest materials and resources to reluctant adults who may be struggling with literacy. 

Presented by: Katharine Ware

Format: Webinar, original date January 15, 2019
Hosted by: Infopeople
Length: 1 hour

How do library administrators and managers foster a healthy, inclusive work environment so all employees can succeed? Unfortunately, individuals with diverse backgrounds and uniqueness are being subjected to subtle and overt bias in the library workplace due to the divisive climate in which we live. We have each been a part of the process; on either end of the bias whether we know it or not.

Presented by: Dr. Michele A. L. Villagran

Format: Webinar, original date July 17, 2018
Hosted by: WebJunction and TechSoup for Libraries
Length: 1 hour

As of 2016, more than 43 million immigrants were living in the US, and that number is growing. Immigration can breathe new life into the local economy as young workers replace retiring baby boomers, open new businesses, and become active consumers. Libraries can ease immigrants’ transition into the community by acting as a resource hub. Asset mapping encourages libraries to go out into their communities and uncover and assess the resources available to immigrants. The information they gather gives the insight libraries need to develop programming to serve these patrons and help them thrive. This webinar will discuss how asset mapping can facilitate community entry for immigrants by helping libraries better understand the needs of this population and address those needs through service and program development.  

Presented by: Heather MacKenzie, Amanda Fullerton and Kenneth Williment

Format: Webinar, original date February 22, 2022
Hosted by: WebJunction
Length: 1 hour

Talking openly about race with kids can dramatically improve their racial literacy—but adults often don't know where to start! Staff from the Salt Lake City Public Library (SLCPL) will share how they built picture book-based kits to give caregivers the tools to have these important conversations. The session will also include discussion on book selection, the SLCPL framework for understanding racial literacy, and some of the joys and challenges that were faced during development and implementation. You'll receive a list of favorite race education resources, and a step-by-step plan for developing kits on your own.

Presented by: Charlene Dy, Lindsey Watts, Diana Castro, and Nancy Funes

Format: Webinar, original date November 14, 2023
Hosted by: WebJunction
Length: 1 hour

Library communities around the country are seeing rising levels of division, distrust, and segregation. Recognizing the need for community healing, library staff at the Richland Library in South Carolina formed the Let’s Talk Race team to explore strategies for deepening community connections and engagement. Since 2016, the Let’s Talk Race team has facilitated more than 250 in-person or online discussions, community forums, and events, reaching more than 4,000 participants, and creating opportunities for civic engagement, community connections, and courageous conversations. Earlier this year, the Richland Library launched the open-source Let’s Talk Race Curriculum, providing a set of easy-to-follow resources for other libraries, museums, and related organizations to implement with their local communities. The curriculum includes facilitation best practices, conversation guides, videos, and more. The curriculum provides a learning pathway to help get started, build facilitation skills, and create conversation guides to hold your own circles of dialog.

Presented by: Tamara King, Heather McCue, and Kathleen Montgomery

Format: Webinar, original date September 27, 2018
Hosted by: WebJunction
Length: 1 hour

You will learn how Next Chapter Book Club (NCBC) helps libraries build community and promote literacy while supporting the educational and social growth of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. NCBC emphasizes inclusion and the joy of reading aloud with friends and is flexible enough to be adapted to the needs and budget of nearly any library. With more than 300 chapters, NCBC is the largest community book club of its kind in the world. Find out how your library can reach out to connect with an underserved population, promoting community inclusion, independence, and productivity for individuals with intellectual disabilities and their families.

Presented by: Tom Fish, Pam Brooks and Maggie Allbee

Format: Webinar, original date February 15, 2023

Hosted by: WebJunction
Length: 1 hour

The history and current experiences of Indigenous peoples and Tribal Nations are complex, rich and diverse. Libraries can play an important role in counteracting damaging myths and narratives about Native peoples, as well as exploring contemporary struggles and joys. This webinar highlights opportunities for libraries to connect their communities to accurate and respectful information, fostering understanding and support of Indigenous peoples past and present. Resources for learning about treaties, Tribal Nations and lands, as well as insights into the experiences of Native communities today are also shared. With a better understanding of these distinctive histories and cultures, library staff can promote learning and knowledge, support engagement with Native issues and peoples, and better serve all individuals in their community.

Presented by: Naomi Bishop

Format: Webinar, original date July 8, 2021
Hosted by: WebJunction
Length: 1 hour

To be truly community-centered, libraries must build and sustain relationships with community partners. But as in any relationship, communication is key to success. This webinar will address fundamental ideas about effective communication with a variety of audiences. Participants will reflect on the iceberg as a metaphor for the ways in which life experiences impact their own communication and practice behaviors that demonstrate active listening, including open-ended questioning. Presenters will share lessons learned about effective communication in the context of COVID-19 and encourage participants to share their own experiences.

Presented by: Kate Goodman, Mary Marques, Gaspar Santos, Falena Hand, and Lynn Williamson

Format: Webinar, original date May 21, 2020
Hosted by: Infopeople
Length: 1 hour

Often residential and day programs for people with developmental disabilities bring clients to their local public library to visit, however, these groups don't really engage with the library's many services or programs. Adults with developmental disabilities also come to the library on their own. Many times, individuals with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities are directed to youth services and not the adult departments which are more appropriate. This confusion could present a barrier to offering these patrons more than just a place to visit.

Would you like to offer programming for adults with developmental disabilities rather than just a place to visit? Join us for this one-hour webinar devoted to an exploration of a range of topics related to programming in your libraries for the adults with developmental disabilities in your community.

Presented by: Carrie Banks and Barbara Klipper

Format: Webinar, original date March 28, 2018

Hosted by: NCompass Live, Nebraska Library Commission
Length: 1 hour

Do you know the ADA standard for where you should place your books on the bookshelf? Do you know what kind of animals can legally be classified as a service animal? Do you know which policies you may want to look at to grant greater access to your services? You will if you attend this overview of how to best provide access to the disabled patrons in your community. The presenter is a long-time advocate for the disabled and was recently appointed as the State of Nebraska ADA Coordinator. As the ADA Coordinator, she will lead the State's ADA Task Force and help ensure that the State's programs, activities and services are accessible to all citizens.

Presenter: Crystal Booker

Format: Webinar, original date September 26, 2011
Hosted by: WebJunction and Library Journal
Length: 1 hour

While public libraries are generally viewed as inclusive spaces, there are large segments of community that do not use them. Beginning in 2004, four large urban library systems from across Canada - Vancouver, Toronto, Regina and Halifax Public Libraries - spent four years working in socially excluded communities, to determine how to make public library services relevant to the needs of underserved communities. As a result, it was discovered that when communities are involved in the identification, development and delivery of library services, there can be an exhilarating effect. Since the conclusion of the highly successful Working Together Project (2004-2008), public libraries from across Canada have integrated community-led approaches and techniques. This webinar, brought to you in collaboration with Library Journal, will discuss the major outcomes of the project and provide examples of how the bringing this approach into library service planning makes libraries even more relevant to local needs.

Presenters: Tracey Jones-Grant, Kenneth Williment, and Randy Gatley.

Format: Webinar, original date September 24, 2020
Hosted by: WebJunction
Length: 1 hour

While classroom training has an important place in library staff education, learning is extended and reinforced when staff have the opportunity to work through difficult topics outside of the classroom. In order to support staff learning about issues of equity, diversity and inclusion (EDI), Multnomah County Library has developed a “Racially Just” toolkit, containing activities staff can use to learn and practice on their own, with colleagues, or in their staff groups. The toolkit workbooks include information and activities related to bias, microaggressions, allyship and cross-cultural communication, as well as a workbook focused on learning about Native American and Alaska Native people and communities. Learn how Multnomah Library developed the workbooks and what indicators signaled that their organization was ready to support staff with self-paced learning about EDI.

Presented by: Ekatrina Sotomayor and Amy Honisett

Format: Webinar, original date March 24, 2021
Hosted by: WebJunction
Length: 1 hour

Libraries across the country are increasingly working to address food insecurity in their local communities. Presenters from the South Carolina State Library, University of South Carolina Arnold School of Public Health SNAP-Ed program, and Richland Library will provide examples of library food access initiatives including seed libraries, community gardens and farmers markets. Guidance will be provided on how to start food access initiatives with limited local partnership options, few staff and limited resources in rural, urban and suburban settings. The session will also explore how two statewide organizations support local libraries in this work through technical assistance and funding.

Presented by: Carrie Draper, Ashley Page, Leighan Cazier and Rebecca Antill

Format: Webinar, original date March 31, 2023

Hosted by: WebJunction
Length: 1 hour

As we work to ensure that our library spaces, services, and programs are welcoming to all members of the community, it is important to know how to design for inclusion. The principles of Universal Design offer guidance on how to design in ways that prioritize usability and accessibility for all. This presentation will introduce the concept of Universal Design, explain how it contrasts with accessibility, and offer concrete advice for how to apply each of the principles of Universal Design at any library. The examples and ideas provided will focus on high-impact changes that can be done within a range of budgets from low (or even no) cost ideas to advice for planning for large-scale renovation projects.  

Presented by: Carli Spina

Format: Webinar, original date February 21, 2019
Hosted by: Infopeople
Length: 1 hour

Wondering how to engage larger audiences on social media? Would you like to learn how social media can help reach audiences that you haven’t tapped into yet? Are diversity and inclusion high on your list of marketing priorities? Social media is a great way to start dialogue and conversations about a variety of topics and to meet customers where they are. This webinar will demonstrate how to use humor, pop culture, children’s materials, and more, to advocate for diverse communities, and to speak up when necessary.

Presented by: Kim Crowder

Format: Webinar, original date December 13, 2018
Hosted by: Infopeople
Length: 1 hour

It seems like everyone is talking about equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI), but what does it really mean to put these values into practice at your library? In this webinar, the presenters will a provide a “starter kit” for EDI training in libraries. They will cover topics such as staff and management buy-in, low-cost training, and how to meaningfully engage staff in an effort to create a workplace culture that is affirming, representative, and inclusive. Additionally, attendees will learn to develop their own practical, useful, and actionable plan for implementing EDI staff learning in their own library.

Presented by: Laurel Johnson and Allyson Coan